Culture · Daily Life · People · Street · vendors

Pruning the flower market

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An evening scene at the traditional Jambagh flower market, which was initially a part of the Moazzam Jahi Market, but shifted to the adjoining road. By default market places in India come with a lot of colours, vibrance textures, patterns and many a time chaos too. The empty baskets in the image perhaps indicate she had good business on the day. The mounds and swirls of flowers are sure to delight many a pedestrians and commuter around the corner

In the recent years the flower market has faced a double whammy – first due to the road widening activity in 2009, which forced many vendors to relocate to more commercial markets. Currently, the Jambagh flower market is undergoing yet another drastic change with the construction of the Hyderabad Metro pushing the vendors further into the narrow bylanes. One cannot help but wonder if the efforts in modernization cannot be achieved without causing far reaching consequences to existing heritage components(traditional bazaar in this case) of the city.

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Urban

Film City – Sets

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I was at the Film City on some work and had a couple of hours to wait. Luckily with a car at my disposal at the site, I wandered around and made some shots. The film city bus rides do pass by some of these sets with the guides telling you which film scene was shot there I am not sure I can recognize any of them. Perhaps you do?

Needless to say some of these sets were under constructions.

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Daily Life · Food · People · Street · vendors

Pulling the strings

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Its festive time with Id-ul-Fitr less than two weeks away. The main preparation for the festival is Sheer Korma and the primary ingredient is the vermiclli. The three brothers live together and engage themselves in making them. With their deft fingers they work the magic and in a matter of minutes they convert a lump of well kneaded dough into strings and leave them to dry. After about 5-7 minutes, a handful of these strings are then rolled and arranged into a swirl to be sold later.

Read more about the brothers and their trade here

Excerpt from wiki: – Sheer khorma or Sheer khurma (شيرخرما, literally “milk with dates” in Urdu) is a festival vermicelli pudding prepared by Muslims onEid ul-Fitr in Pakistan,India and Bangladesh. It is a traditional Muslim festive breakfast, and a dessert for celebrations. Sheer (شير), isPersian for milk and khurma(خرما) is Persian for dates. This dish is made from dried dates.

This special dish is served on the morning of Eid day in the family after the Eid prayer as breakfast, and throughout the day to all the visiting guests.

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Daily Life · Food · People · Street · Urban · vendors

Fresh water fish fried and sold as a delicious treat on the streets. The arrangement of the food is usually very important for the business

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Daily Life · Food · Street

Its always interesting to see rumali roties being made. Always wondered how these road side chefs manage to toss it in the air after rolling and make it look so easy. I don’t want to imagine what my kitchen would look like if I ever attempted making them. 🙂

[text from wiki]
Rumali Roti is a thin bread from the northern part of India and Pakistan and a traditional element in Mughlai cuisine. The word rumal means handkerchief in Urdu and Hindi, and the name rumali roti means handkerchief bread. The bread is extremely thin and supple, and the fact that it is usually served folded like a handkerchief are the probable sources of the name. During the Mughal period, the roti was used like a cloth to wipe off the excess oil off the hands after the completion of an oil-rich food laden with meat and fat. The rumali roti also occupied a unique place in the emblem of the royalty of Oudh under the control of Mughals.
The bread is usually made with a combination of whole and white wheat flours (atta and maida respectively) and best cooked on top of an inverted Indian griddle (kadhai).

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