Daily Life · Food · People · Street · vendors

Pulling the strings

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Its festive time with Id-ul-Fitr less than two weeks away. The main preparation for the festival is Sheer Korma and the primary ingredient is the vermiclli. The three brothers live together and engage themselves in making them. With their deft fingers they work the magic and in a matter of minutes they convert a lump of well kneaded dough into strings and leave them to dry. After about 5-7 minutes, a handful of these strings are then rolled and arranged into a swirl to be sold later.

Read more about the brothers and their trade here

Excerpt from wiki: – Sheer khorma or Sheer khurma (شيرخرما, literally “milk with dates” in Urdu) is a festival vermicelli pudding prepared by Muslims onEid ul-Fitr in Pakistan,India and Bangladesh. It is a traditional Muslim festive breakfast, and a dessert for celebrations. Sheer (شير), isPersian for milk and khurma(خرما) is Persian for dates. This dish is made from dried dates.

This special dish is served on the morning of Eid day in the family after the Eid prayer as breakfast, and throughout the day to all the visiting guests.

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Daily Life · Food · People · Street · Urban · vendors

Fresh water fish fried and sold as a delicious treat on the streets. The arrangement of the food is usually very important for the business

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Daily Life · Food · Street

Its always interesting to see rumali roties being made. Always wondered how these road side chefs manage to toss it in the air after rolling and make it look so easy. I don’t want to imagine what my kitchen would look like if I ever attempted making them. 🙂

[text from wiki]
Rumali Roti is a thin bread from the northern part of India and Pakistan and a traditional element in Mughlai cuisine. The word rumal means handkerchief in Urdu and Hindi, and the name rumali roti means handkerchief bread. The bread is extremely thin and supple, and the fact that it is usually served folded like a handkerchief are the probable sources of the name. During the Mughal period, the roti was used like a cloth to wipe off the excess oil off the hands after the completion of an oil-rich food laden with meat and fat. The rumali roti also occupied a unique place in the emblem of the royalty of Oudh under the control of Mughals.
The bread is usually made with a combination of whole and white wheat flours (atta and maida respectively) and best cooked on top of an inverted Indian griddle (kadhai).

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Culture · Food · People · portrait · Street

Grilled Delights!

Of the immensely popular street food on the streets of old city Hyderabad, the kebabs deserve a special mention.

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Culture · Daily Life · Food · People · Street · Urban · vendors

 

Behind High Court, sweet jalebis and savouries are sold every afternoon come rain or shine. Kailashnath(in the picture) says his family has been doing this for the last 35 years! You find similar stall although in smaller number at R.P. Road too

Its easier to get a more appealing picture if I went again when the light wasnt harsh but I wanted to show the conditions in which these people do their job.

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Culture · Food · Heritage

Qubani ka Meetha

Qubani ka meetha is an Indian dessert made from dried apricots originating from Hyderabad, India.[2] It is a common feature at Hyderabadi weddings.

Qubani is Urdu for apricot; it is believed that apricots were introduced to the subcontinent by Central Asians

Dried apricots from Afghanistan are especially prized for their flavor. Qubani ka Meetha is a very popular dessert of Hyderabadi cuisine.

Preparation of the dish involves boiling apricots with syrup until they assume the consistency of a thick soup or compote. The dessert is topped with blanched almonds or apricot kernels, and is traditionally garnished with malai (extra thick cream, ideally from buffalo milk), but also with custard or ice cream.

Preparation time: overnight
Cooking time: 45 minutes

Ingredients

Dried apricots 1 kg
Sugar 150 gm
Fresh cream 250 gm

Method

Soak apricots overnight in just enough water to cover them. Add half the sugar to apricots while soak ing. Next morning, boil apricots in the same water till tender. Remove seeds. Sieve till only the fibre remains in the strainer. Add a little water, the remaining sugar and cook at medium heat till desired consistency is obtained.

Crack open the apricot seeds and remove kernel. Blanch the kernel and remove skin. Garnish the dish with these apricot kernels.

Serve with malai (clotted cream).

Text courtesy : wiki

Recipe courtesy : tribuneindia

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